Supercon Talk: Mike Szczys Runs Down the State of the Hackaday 2019 888011000 110888 2019 was a great year for Hackaday. It marked the fifteenth year of the hacker community’s hive-brain, which is basically forever in Web Years, and we’re still laser-focused on bringing you the hacks that motivate you to create the hacks that inspire somebody else to produce the hacks of tomorrow. We’re exceptionally proud that Hackaday stays a must-read in the worldwide neighborhood of folks doing innovative things with technology. At the Superconference, our editor-in-chief Mike Szczys covered the very best brand-new advancements here at Hackaday HQ in 2019: new weekly columns, mobile-friendly formats for both Hackaday’s front page and the mobile app for Hackaday.io, our podcast, some excellent brand-new contests, and a lots of great extensive original articles from our crew of writers. Which’s just what was new last year. The part of Mike’s talk that I took pleasure in the most, though, was his appearance back fifteen years ago to when Hackaday was just born. In the stepping in 5,545 days, we have actually composed more than 34,718 posts. (A lot for “hack-a-day”, he states, doing the math.) We’re nearing our millionth remark. That’s a great deal of Hackaday. So it’s fun to ask what has altered over this time, and track it through the memory of a hardware hacker. Dig the old image styling! Groovy.Back in 2008, Hackaday was a spry four-year-old, and we were featuring robotic hacks where the brains and Internet connection were supplied by WRT-54G routers, SMS connectivity was provided by hacking into a Nokia 3100, and the battery weighed more than the motors yet only lasted fifteen minutes. Today’s hacks toss in an ESP32, any old inexpensive SMS module, and an off-the-shelf Li-Ion battery pack and will run for days. Do not even get me started on 3D printers. Or the ease of composing software for any of these makers. We have actually never ever lived in better times! But that doesn’t mean that every job needs to be a superconducting supercollider either; it’s equally essential to display our easier tasks too, to offer new people a grip into the hacking scene. And it’s likewise vital to show individuals how you failed, attempted, and attempted once again prior to declaring triumph. If all of our completed jobs look like they were conjured out of thin air, it hides all of the knowing that went into them, and that’s where a lot of the real gold is buried. While we include functions, media reoccur, and the cutting edge ends up being less and less distinguishable from magic, one thing stays continuous: revealing each other what we depend on, sharing our best ideas and tricks, and pressing forward the hacker state of the art. Long live Hackaday! [embed ded content]
March 28, 2020 No Comments Tech Hacks Jimmy Jones

2019 was a terrific year for Hackaday. It marked the fifteenth year of the hacker community’s hive-brain, which is basically permanently in Web Years, and we’re still laser-focused on bringing you the hacks that influence you to create the hacks that motivate somebody else to create the hacks of tomorrow.

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our podcast, some excellent brand-new contests, and a lots of great extensive original articles from our crew of writers. Which’s just what was new last year. The part of Mike’s talk that I took pleasure in the most, though, was his appearance back fifteen years ago to when Hackaday was just born. In the stepping in 5,545 days, we have actually composed more than 34,718 posts. (A lot for “hack-a-day”, he states, doing the math.) We’re nearing our millionth remark. That’s a great deal of Hackaday. So it’s fun to ask what has altered over this time, and track it through the memory of a hardware hacker. Dig the old image styling! Groovy.Back in 2008, Hackaday was a spry four-year-old, and we were featuring robotic hacks where the brains and Internet connection were supplied by WRT-54G routers, SMS connectivity was provided by hacking into a Nokia 3100, and the battery weighed more than the motors yet only lasted fifteen minutes. Today’s hacks toss in an ESP32, any old inexpensive SMS module, and an off-the-shelf Li-Ion battery pack and will run for days. Do not even get me started on 3D printers. Or the ease of composing software for any of these makers. We have actually never ever lived in better times! But that doesn’t mean that every job needs to be a superconducting supercollider either; it’s equally essential to display our easier tasks too, to offer new people a grip into the hacking scene. And it’s likewise vital to show individuals how you failed, attempted, and attempted once again prior to declaring triumph. If all of our completed jobs look like they were conjured out of thin air, it hides all of the knowing that went into them, and that’s where a lot of the real gold is buried. While we include functions, media reoccur, and the cutting edge ends up being less and less distinguishable from magic, one thing stays continuous: revealing each other what we depend on, sharing our best ideas and tricks, and pressing forward the hacker state of the art. Long live Hackaday! [embed ded content]+http://besttechideas.com/tech-hacks/supercon-talk-mike-szczys-runs-down-the-state-of-the-hackaday-2019/" target="_blank"> the very best brand-new advancements here at Hackaday HQ in 2019: new weekly columns, mobile-friendly formats for both Hackaday’s front page and the mobile app for Hackaday.io, our podcast, some excellent brand-new contests, and a lots of great extensive original articles from our crew of writers. Which’s just what was new last year. The part of Mike’s talk that I took pleasure in the most, though, was his appearance back fifteen years ago to when Hackaday was just born. In the stepping in 5,545 days, we have actually composed more than 34,718 posts. (A lot for “hack-a-day”, he states, doing the math.) We’re nearing our millionth remark. That’s a great deal of Hackaday. So it’s fun to ask what has altered over this time, and track it through the memory of a hardware hacker. Dig the old image styling! Groovy.Back in 2008, Hackaday was a spry four-year-old, and we were featuring robotic hacks where the brains and Internet connection were supplied by WRT-54G routers, SMS connectivity was provided by hacking into a Nokia 3100, and the battery weighed more than the motors yet only lasted fifteen minutes. Today’s hacks toss in an ESP32, any old inexpensive SMS module, and an off-the-shelf Li-Ion battery pack and will run for days. Do not even get me started on 3D printers. Or the ease of composing software for any of these makers. We have actually never ever lived in better times! But that doesn’t mean that every job needs to be a superconducting supercollider either; it’s equally essential to display our easier tasks too, to offer new people a grip into the hacking scene. And it’s likewise vital to show individuals how you failed, attempted, and attempted once again prior to declaring triumph. If all of our completed jobs look like they were conjured out of thin air, it hides all of the knowing that went into them, and that’s where a lot of the real gold is buried. While we include functions, media reoccur, and the cutting edge ends up being less and less distinguishable from magic, one thing stays continuous: revealing each other what we depend on, sharing our best ideas and tricks, and pressing forward the hacker state of the art. Long live Hackaday! [embed ded content]" target="_blank"> the very best brand-new advancements here at Hackaday HQ in 2019: new weekly columns, mobile-friendly formats for both Hackaday’s front page and the mobile app for Hackaday.io, our podcast, some excellent brand-new contests, and a lots of great extensive original articles from our crew of writers. Which’s just what was new last year. The part of Mike’s talk that I took pleasure in the most, though, was his appearance back fifteen years ago to when Hackaday was just born. In the stepping in 5,545 days, we have actually composed more than 34,718 posts. (A lot for “hack-a-day”, he states, doing the math.) We’re nearing our millionth remark. That’s a great deal of Hackaday. So it’s fun to ask what has altered over this time, and track it through the memory of a hardware hacker. Dig the old image styling! Groovy.Back in 2008, Hackaday was a spry four-year-old, and we were featuring robotic hacks where the brains and Internet connection were supplied by WRT-54G routers, SMS connectivity was provided by hacking into a Nokia 3100, and the battery weighed more than the motors yet only lasted fifteen minutes. Today’s hacks toss in an ESP32, any old inexpensive SMS module, and an off-the-shelf Li-Ion battery pack and will run for days. Do not even get me started on 3D printers. Or the ease of composing software for any of these makers. We have actually never ever lived in better times! But that doesn’t mean that every job needs to be a superconducting supercollider either; it’s equally essential to display our easier tasks too, to offer new people a grip into the hacking scene. And it’s likewise vital to show individuals how you failed, attempted, and attempted once again prior to declaring triumph. If all of our completed jobs look like they were conjured out of thin air, it hides all of the knowing that went into them, and that’s where a lot of the real gold is buried. While we include functions, media reoccur, and the cutting edge ends up being less and less distinguishable from magic, one thing stays continuous: revealing each other what we depend on, sharing our best ideas and tricks, and pressing forward the hacker state of the art. Long live Hackaday! [embed ded content]&source=http://besttechideas.com/tech-hacks/supercon-talk-mike-szczys-runs-down-the-state-of-the-hackaday-2019/" target="_blank">
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